Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography

April 5, 2016

# 16.06 Inter-industry labor flows

Filed under: 2016 — Tags: , , , , , — mattehartog @ 1:31 am

Frank Neffke, Anne Otto, Antje Weyh

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Labor flows across industries reallocate resources and diffuse knowledge among economic activities. However, surprisingly little is known about the structure of such inter-industry flows. How freely do workers switch jobs among industries? Between which pairs of industries do we observe such switches? Do different types of workers have different transition matrices? Do these matrices change over time? Using German social security data, we generate stylized facts about inter-industry labor mobility and explore its consequences. We find that workers switch industries along tight paths that link industries in a sparse network. This labor-flow network is relatively stable over time, similar for workers in different occupations and wage categories and independent of whether workers move locally or over larger distances. When using these networks to construct inter-industry relatedness measures they prove better predictors of local industry growth rates than co-location or input-based alternatives. However, because industries that exchange much labor typically do not have correlated growth paths, the sparseness of the labor-flow network does not necessarily prevent a smooth reallocation of workers from shrinking to growing industries. To facilitate future research, the inter-industry relatedness matrices we develop are made available as an online appendix to this paper.

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February 18, 2015

# 15.05 When are recruited competences supportive of innovation? Inter-industry differences in the importance of similarity and diversity

Filed under: 2015 — Tags: , , , , — mattehartog @ 6:20 pm

Sverre J. Herstad  & Tore Sandven

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Building on recent evolutionary thinking, this paper links the present innovation performance of Norwegian firms to their past aggregate inflows of experienced employees through the labor market. In the upper part of OECDs technology intensity classification, firms strengthen their capacity to generate novelty sales by recruiting from within their own sector domains. By contrast, this form of recruitment is negatively associated with performance in low-tech industries. Aggregate inflows from related industries is generally supportive of performance, while inflows from prior employment in the research system is not. This underscores the dependence of industrial innovation on specialized competences and work practices that originate in the domain of industry itself; and, thus, the interdependencies between firms and larger industrial agglomerations.

August 26, 2012

# 12.15 The Resilience of Dutch Regions to Economic Shocks. Measuring the relevance of interactions among firms and workers.

Dario Diodato and Anet Weterings

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Although increasing attention is paid to the resilience of regions to economic shocks, theoretical and empirical insights in the determinants of regional resilience are still limited. This paper aims to make a first step in quantifying regional resilience. Using a model, we explore how three regional factors jointly contribute to the resilience of regions to economic shocks: 1) the network of buyer-supplier relationships within and between regions, 2) the level of relatedness between industries, which facilitates intersectoral labor mobility and, 3) the geographical position of a region which determines the possibilities of commuting for workers. The supply network mainly determines the propagation of the shock, while possibilities for intersectoral and interregional labor mobility affect a regional economy’s capacity to recover from the shock. To illustrate the workings of the model, it is applied to the case of the Netherlands using data on buyer-supplier relationships within and between Dutch regions, as well as on intersectoral and interregional labour mobility.

March 15, 2010

#10.04 Localized Spillovers and Knowledge Flows: How Does Proximity Influence the Performance of Plants?

Rikard H. Eriksson

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By means of a unique longitudinal database with information on all plants and employees in the Swedish economy, this paper analyzes how geographical proximity influences the impact of spillovers and knowledge flows on the productivity growth of plants. Concerning the effects of spillovers, we show that the density of economic activities as such mainly contributes to plant performance within a very short distance and that the composition of economic activities is more influential further away. Regarding the influence of local industrial setup, proximity increases the need to be located near different, but related, industries whereas increased distance implies a greater effect of intra-industry spillovers. The analyses also demonstrate that knowledge flows via the mobility of skilled labor is primarily a sub-regional phenomenon. Only inflows of skills that are related to the existing knowledge base of plants and come from less than 50 kilometers away have a positive effect on plant performance. Concerning outflows of skills, the results indicate that it is less harmful for a dispatching plant if a former employee remains within the local economy as compared to leaving for a job in another part of the national economy.

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