Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography

June 16, 2017

# 17.15 Co-inventor Networks and Knowledge Production in Specialized and Diversified Cities

Filed under: 2017 — Tags: , , , , , — mattehartog @ 6:44 pm

Frank van der Wouden, David L. Rigby

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Why do some cities produce more knowledge than others? The standard explanation rests upon the social networks that connect economic actors, within and between cities, and that structure the quantity and the quality of interactions from which new ideas are generated. These interactions are increasingly understood as shaped by different forms of proximity that congeal, at different times in different places, in complex assemblies that give rise to different forms of competitive advantage. Recent research focusing on the U.S. urban system has shown that metropolitan regions characterized by more extensive local and non-local network ties outperform cities where economic agents are isolated. However, across most of this work, little attention is given to the character of the local knowledge base and whether that is related to the structure of co-inventor networks. In this paper, we show that the social networks linking co-inventors differ between cities that produce specialized knowledge and those that produce diversified knowledge. These ideas are extended in models of tie-formation that show inventors in specialized cities value spatial proximity less and cognitive proximity more than inventors in diversified cities as they partner with collaborators from other urban areas.

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March 7, 2016

# 16.04 (Un)Related Variety and Employment Growth at the Sub-Regional Level

Filed under: 2016 — Tags: , , , , — mattehartog @ 7:47 pm

Matthias Firgo and Peter Mayerhofer

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Empirical results on the link between growth and diversity in (un)related industries proved to be highly dependent on the specific regional and temporal context. Making use of highly disaggregated employment data at the sub-regional level, we find that higher employment growth in Austria is mainly linked to unrelated variety. However, in-depth analyses by sectors and regional regimes illustrate substantial heterogeneity in the results, mainly driven by the service sector and by a large number of relatively small regions. Thus, our results argue against structural policy conclusions based on assessments across all economic sectors or different types of regions.

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